Revenue bills can be proposed only by?

Revenue bills can be proposed only by

Revenue bills can be proposed only by the House of Senate.

Revenue bills are typically proposed by the government or governing body of a jurisdiction, such as a state or national government. In the United States, revenue bills are typically proposed by the Congress, which is made up of the Senate and the House of Representatives. In most cases, revenue bills must originate in the House of Representatives, according to the Constitution of the United States. In other countries, the process for proposing revenue bills may be different.

Where does Revenue bills comes from?

Based on the Article I, Section 7, of the United States Constitution, it is one that states that all bills for raising revenue shall come from in the House of Representatives.

There is also a clause that the Senate can propose, or concur with, any kind of amendments.

Revenue bills are bills that propose to raise revenue for the government, typically through the imposition of taxes or other fees.

They are introduced in the legislative branch of government and must be passed by both the House of Representatives and the Senate before they can become law. In the United States, revenue bills must originate in the House of Representatives, according to Article I, Section 7 of the Constitution. This means that revenue bills must be introduced in the House first and then proceed to the Senate for consideration. Once a revenue bill has been passed by both chambers of Congress, it must be signed into law by the President in order to take effect.

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